GetUSB.info Logo
USB affects your everyday life.
We'll show you how.

5 Realistic Looking USB Airplane Flash Drives

Promotional items have been around for years. Coffee mugs, pens, etc are still the default item for marketing manager without an imagination. Back in 2000 the flash drive was the new kid on the block for swag. Flash forward five years and the USB stick was a bit like the coffee mug, old and boring. At about this same time manufacturing processes started improving for using silicon as a moldable material. This is where the custom flash drive started gaining popularity. As time move along, the process and technology got even better. Today we are seeing some fantastic promotional items in the shape of logo’s, parts, products and even airplanes.

Today we list five realistic looking USB airplane designs that would get any marketing manager excited about a promotional flash drive.

Let’s take a look large cabin cruiser

airplane usb, flash drive

Here is the Pilatus airplane

flash drive airplane, pilatus

Here is a Hawker airplane

usb airplane, hawker

Here is the F16 and F35 planes designed by Lockheed Martin

usb jet, F16

 

usb jet, F35

These are all very impressive designs and certainly a piece of swag any trade show junkie, or even executive, would love to have. Times have certainly changed. The source for these designs is through a company named www.USBCOPIER.com and these products or any customized design can be created, just contact them.

Continue Reading

Corsair Brings USB and microUSB Stick to CES 2014

Corsair continues their reputation for high speed, high quality USB products.  This year at the CES 2014 show Corsair is showing off their new Voyager Go USB drive.

Two improvements with this device:

1)  The USB includes a standard USB connector and a microUSB connector.  This addition makes it easier to store files from a portable device directly to the flash memory.

2)  The USB cap and USB body include a loop so when connected with a lanyard you no longer have the option to lose the cap.  This is the first that I’ve seen with a cap/body configuration like this…and it should have happened years ago.

Corsair USB

The Corsair Voyager Go USB is available as a 3.0 device in 16, 32 and 64GB capacity.  USB 3.0 can boost transfer speeds in excess of 135MB/s however we must realize this spec is not real-world environment.

Corsair microUSB

Source:  Corsair, CES.

Continue Reading

Longevity of USB Flash and Wear Leveling

I think we have all heard a USB can only be used so many times.  Some say the number is 1,000 writes – some say the number is 100,000 writes.  One thing I do know for sure, it’s impossible to tell on any one specific device.  The life cycle of a USB is directly related to the flash memory…and from model to model or style to style, who knows what quality of flash is used.  With that said, we can still explain the theory behind making USB drives last longer.  For the most part it boils down to several elements  A)  the memory type and quality and B) the wear leveling technique.

As a quick summary the NAND flash in USB can be either SLC, MLC or TLC (single cell, multi-layer cell or triple-layer cell memory).  Typically you will find MLC and now mostly TLC in USB sticks.  SLC can be found but typically on the very high end devices.

Wear leveling is a technique to prolong the life of the erasable flash memory.  To summarize, flash memory has individual, erasable segments that can be set as zero’s or ones (set as either positive or negative charge).  However, after a certain number of erase and write cycles the segment (cell) becomes too unstable for reliable use.

Wear leveling is the algorithm used by the controller on the device which attempts to arrange the erase and writes evenly across the flash medium.  Typically flash can have a cycle between 3,000 and 5,000 erase/writes.  In addition to the usable area, the flash also has some cells with specific blocks for extended live which can handle up to 100,000 writes.  This is the area where the controller makes not of the segments previously used and maps out the next best cells to use during an erase/write cycle.

There are three types of wear leveling.

No wear leveling – A Flash memory storage system with no wear leveling will not last very long if it is writing data to the flash. Without wear leveling, the Flash controller must permanently assign the logical addresses from the host computer to the physical addresses of the Flash memory. This means that every write to a previously written block must first be read, erased, modified, and re-written to the same location. This is very time consuming and highly written locations will wear out quickly with other locations even being completely unused. Once a few blocks reach their end of life the drive is no longer operable.

Dynamic wear leveling – The first developed type of leveling is called dynamic wear leveling and it uses a map to linklogicl block addresses from the host to the physical Flash memory. Each time the host writes replacement data, the map is updated so the original physical block is marked as invalid data, and a new block is linked to that map entry. Each time a block of data is re-written to the Flash memory it is written to a new location.

Static wear leveling – The other type of wear leveling is called static wear leveling which also uses a map to link the block addresses to physical memory addresses. Static wear leveling works the same as dynamic wear leveling except the static blocks that do not change are periodically moved so that these low usage cells are able to be used by other data. This rotational effect of block addressing enables an SSD to operate until most of the blocks are near their end of life.

The above are three types of wear leveling and there are three types of techniques used to extend the life of a USB drive.

Error correction – Code which is kept and logs bad blocks so they cannot be used again in future writes.

Pool reserve – Where if a write fails to a block it can be re-routed to the pool of reserved blocks and written there.

Track usage  – Blocks on the media can be tracked in a least recently used queue of some sort. The data structures for the queue itself must be wear leveled as well as this queue information is constantly changing.

Source:  Wikipedia and Nexcopy Inc. duplicator manufacturer.

Continue Reading

Rip and Tear Gigabytes To Go

Burning CDs is slow and impractical when at a clients site.  In addition, who wants to leave behind their 16GB flash drive with a mix of personal and professional information?  With that said, we designed a small pack of drives we could tear and use when needed.  Since we travel and present files to clients this gives us an easy, inexpensive and creative way to leave files with the client.

The design lends itself to the old-school flyers you’d see around town for a local band playing at a pub or someone looking to offer odd-job services.  The physical form factor says it all…quick, easy, here-ya-go.


Each pack of four is recycled paper used as it’s chassis/case and COB memory and USB connector (Chip On Board) for the memory.  Each tab is perforated for easy tear and use functionality.

The designer Kurt Rampton of Bolt Group offers the drives in a couple different

Continue Reading

Flash Memory – Supply and Demand

In recent weeks the cost of flash memory has increased substantially.  The commodity product, is for the most part, a stable consumable with pricing that fluctuations in single digit percentages.  However, lately the prices have increased between 10-30%.  As with any product there are variables which contribute to price and the following information might help explain why flash memory is getting more expensive.

The two largest manufacturers of flash memory (NAND memory) are Samsung and Toshiba.  Together they account for about 70% of the world’s flash.  These companies produce a wide variety of flash memory models and the factories have various levels of quality for the output of their product.

Typically the high performance memory that gets the best test ratings is sold to large consumers like Apple, Nokia and Sony.  As the ratings for the speed of the memory drop, these variants get pushed into the low-end market segments, such as USB drives and inexpensive MP3 players and other promotional gadgets.

In Q3 2012 Toshiba made an announcement they will reduce world wide production by 30%.  Since this time, flash pricing has remained stable and has not decreased in cost.

With the on-going patent battles between Apple and Samsung the Cupertino based company made a decision

Continue Reading

Flash Memory Puts Mars Curiosity into Safe Mode


As with any good project, there should always be a back up plan.  The Curiosity for Mars is no different.  The system has a B-Side computer in the event the A-Side computer went down…well guess what, it went down.

There is a theory that cosmic rays affected some of the flash memory on Curiosity causing the A-Side computer to shut down and reboot into Safe Mode.

JPL is currently backup up the A-Side data to the B-Side computer and should reboot by weeks end.  Configuration and data transfer can take a while, then of course the verification process of everything done right.

JPL states:

“The hardware that we fly is radiation tolerant, but there’s a limit to how hardened it can be, you can still get high-energy particles that can cause the memory to be corrupted. It certainly is a possibility and that’s what we’re looking into.”

For updates please visit the NASA website.

Continue Reading
3D Printing

Copyright ©

Copyright © 2011-2016 by
USB Powered Gadgets and more...
All rights reserved.

GetUSB offers multiple positions on our site for a variety of advertisements.

For more information,

Visit Our Advertising Page
Nexcopy provides USB copy protection with digital rights management for data loaded to USB flash drives. If you have Intellectual Property worth protecting from illegal copying, duplication or redistribution, then please Contact Us to learn more.

GetUSB | 13 Orchard Road Ste 102 | Lake Forest | CA | 92630 | P: +1 949 481 6479